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2013 – U.S. Launch, Human

By John Holst | February 9, 2015
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In 1962, the United States became the second nation after the Soviet Union to successfully orbit a crewed spacecraft. For thirty years, from 1981 to 2011, the crewed orbital vehicle of the United States was the Space Shuttle. However, following the Shuttle’s retirement and its subsequent final flight in July 2011, the United States has been without a crewed orbital launch capacity. This space transportation gap is expected to last until 2018. 

Human Space Launch

By John Holst | February 9, 2015
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During 2017, Russia was the only nation that launched humans into orbit. Russia continued providing its service, ferrying passengers to the International Space Station (ISS). Of the…

Earth Observation Satellites Track Global Water Supply

By John Holst | February 6, 2015
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The World Economic Forum named water supply a global risk in its 2013 annual report. Space assets are helping to mitigate and monitor this risk. In January 2013, the World Resource Institute released the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas, a free tool that integrates satellite and ground-based hydrologic data with socioeconomic data.

Landsat Data Wants to be Free

By John Holst | February 6, 2015
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In 2008, the United States Geological Survey made Landsat data freely available, and the response greatly surpassed expectations. Image downloads from the satellite Earth observation and imaging program increased from an average of 38 per day to 5,700 per day, reaching 14 million downloads by November 2013.

2013 – U.S. Space Industry Outlook

By bmccarrie | February 6, 2015
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The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that demand for many space-relevant occupations will grow from 2010 to 2020. Though encouraging, this does not necessarily translate to predicted growth within the space industry, as individuals in these occupations work in a wide variety of industries.

Earth Observation Imagery, Twitter, and Fighting Fires

By John Holst | February 6, 2015
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In the immediate aftermath of a disaster, it can be difficult to make full use of satellite data because there is not enough time to fully analyze enough data to obtain practical information. New efforts at crowdsourcing analysis have provided vital information following the tornados in Moore, Oklahoma, and the fires in Black Forest, Colorado.

2013 – Space Foundation Survey of U.S. Companies

By bmccarrie | February 6, 2015
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In 2012, the total civilian U.S. space workforce represented by the six NAICS codes mentioned previously included approximately ## individuals working in more than two thousand establishments. Exhibit 4c provides a snapshot of space employment of some of the organizations likely included in this total.

Satellite Communications and Typhoons

By John Holst | February 6, 2015
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Space provides a uniquely valuable vantage from which to track conditions and events on the Earth’s surface. The November 2013 typhoon that decimated the Philippines was tracked from space well before landfall, allowing some citizens to be evacuated and countless others to prepare for the storm.

2013 – Workforce

By bmccarrie | February 6, 2015
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Trends in the global space workforce continue to be mixed, with the U.S. space workforce contracting for the sixth year in a row while space workforces in Japan and Europe saw further increases.

Energy, Resources, and Environmental Management

By John Holst | February 6, 2015
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Due to the wide perspective of Earth provided by some satellites, industries involved in energy, resources, and environmental management are benefiting from multiple new developments in satellite technology and services. The Earth’s environment is in constant flux as natural resources are consumed and renewed continually.