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European Cooperative Organization and Government Space Budgets

United Kingdom Government Space Budget


2011 – United Kingdom Government Space Budget – Snapshot

Civil space activities in the United Kingdom (UK) are primarily funded through the United Kingdom Space Agency (UKSA), which became operational in April 2011, and the Technology Strategy Board (TSB). Space budgets for FY 10/11, which ran from April 2010 through March 2011, had not been published by the UKSA as of January 2012.

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2010 – United Kingdom Government Space Budget – Snapshot

The British government established the United Kingdom Space Agency (UKSA) in 2010. However, the organization was not fully operational during 2010 and responsibility and funding for space activities remained distributed through several agencies. In FY 09/10, which ran from April 2009 through March 2010, estimated space spending in the UK totaled £## million (US$## million), excluding the country’s ESA contribution.

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2009 – United Kingdom Government Space Budget – Snapshot

In the United Kingdom, responsibility for space activities is distributed across several agencies. Through 2009, space activities in the United Kingdom were coordinated by the British National Space Centre (BNSC), although individual agencies retain control of their own budgets. In December 2009, Britain’s Science Minister announced a decision to establish a dedicated British space agency to direct the country’s space policy, although the exact date this agency will begin to operate is unknown.

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2008 – United Kingdom Government Space Budget – Snapshot

The UK Civil Space Strategy 2008-2012 and Beyond, updated in early 2008, recommends spending for climatology, Earth observation, and Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC) satellites. The United Kingdom’s leadership in the field of disaster monitoring continued in 2008, as DMC imagery provided vital information in regions hit by natural disasters. There are also plans to supply climate researchers with free imagery from the next generation of DMC satellites.

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