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2014 – Military Communications

Global, dedicated, and secure communications networks are vital to governments, militaries, and agencies around the world. Increased demand for capacity—particularly secure connectivity using non-commercial frequency bands—continued to drive deployment of dedicated military communications satellite systems. The U.S. military bought significant capacity from commercial operators such as Intelsat and SES in 2014. However, the way the military buys the bandwidth has been criticized by commercial satellite communications services as expensive and outdated.

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2012 – ESA: SSA

Europe is investing in a pan-European SSA capability through an ESA program that was initiated in 2009. Investment of €## million (US$## million) was initially requested for full-scale development, but ESA governments decided to spend only €## million (US$## million) over three years. So far, ESA has spent €## million (US$## million) on development. Some of that funding supported construction of ## prototype space surveillance radars. The first radar, located in Spain and built by Germany, was completed in October 2012 with validation and testing beginning in November.

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2012 – Satellite Radio

Revenue for satellite radio broadcasting is estimated at $## billion in 2012, a ##% increase from $## billion in 2011. Sirius XM continues to be the sole revenue generator in this industry segment. In Europe, Madrid-based Ondas Media confirmed that it has temporarily abandoned its plan to launch its own radio broadcasting satellite due to Europe’s ongoing economic challenges. However, the company’s French affiliate, Onde Numérique, still plans to introduce its service in France by 2013.

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2005 – Government Space Budgets Overview

Non-U.S. military estimates, which are for 2004, include the following countries: United Kingdom, France, Russia, Germany, Belgium, Spain, Italy, and Israel. China’s budget includes both military and civil expenditures. Note that the estimate of China’s space budget is controversial. At a NASA budget hearing in April 2006, much of the discussion was about the possible size of China’s space program and its ability to complete its plans to land astronauts on the Moon in 2017.

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2012 – Mexican Government Space Budget

In calendar year 2012, the government of Mexico allocated a budget of ## million pesos (US$# million) to the Agencia Espacial Mexicana (AEM). The agency was established by law in 2010 and commenced operations in late 2011, so 2012 was the first full year of activity. AEM is a young and growing agency, and its budget is expected to rise to ## million pesos (US$# million) in calendar year 2013.

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2012 – Spanish Government Space Budget

The Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), the primary organization responsible for space activities in Spain, received appropriations from Spain’s national budget of €## million (US$## million) in 2012, a decrease of ##% over 2011 levels. INTA also receives revenue from its own commercial operations. Spain’s contribution to ESA is not funded through INTA, but through the Center for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI). In 2012, Spain’s ESA contribution was €## million (US$## million), a decrease of ##% from its 2011 ESA contribution.

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2012 – European Space Agency Budget

ESA operated with a 2012 budget of €## billion (US$## billion), a ##% increase from the 2011 budget of €## billion (US$## billion). As in the prior two years, the largest three ESA funding line items were Earth observation activities at ##%, navigation activities at ##%, and activities related to the Ariane and Vega launch vehicles at ##% of the budget. During 2012, Poland signed a formal Accession Agreement to become ESA’s twentieth member state. Poland’s mandatory contribution as an ESA member will begin to appear in ESA budgets starting in 2013.

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2013 – Spanish Government Space Budget

The Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), the primary organization responsible for space activities in Spain, received appropriations from Spain’s national budget of €## million (US$## million) in 2013, a decrease of ##% over 2012 levels. INTA also receives revenue from its own commercial operations. Spain’s contribution to ESA is not funded through INTA, but through the Center for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI). In 2013, Spain’s ESA contribution was €## million (US$## million), a decrease of ##% from the 2012 ESA contribution.

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