South Korea


2009 – Commercial Human Spaceflight – Snapshot

Revenue from in-space activities derives mainly from commercial business taking place in space or transportation services to and from space. For example, governments plan to use the private sector to deliver cargo, and eventually astronauts, to the ISS. In the future, other in-space markets could include research and development services, manufacturing, satellite refueling, and orbital debris clean-up. Based on current in-orbit activity, there are three main categories: platform-based services, transportation-based services, and personal spaceflight.

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2009 – South Korean Government Space Budget – Snapshot

In 2009, South Korea spent an estimated ## billion won (US$## million) on civil space, a ##% decrease from the 2008 budget of ## billion won (US$## million). While South Korea’s space budget decreased between 2008 and 2009 in the national currency, changes in the dollar to won exchange rate during that time resulted in a slight increase in the U.S. dollar equivalent value for the 2009 budget as compared to 2008. South Korea’s 2009 civil space spending constitutes approximately ##% of the country’s ## trillion won (US$## billion) national budget. Civil space activities in South Korea are carried out by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST).

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2009 – PISA Test Snapshot

An examination of PISA test scores among 14 countries active in space offers a more focused view of relative math and science literacy, which has implications for the numbers of STEM graduates each country produces and in turn the supply of STEM-skilled workers available for space-related professions. Exhibit 4bb shows national PISA test scores from 2009 for major space countries in mathematics and science.

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2009 – South Korean Workforce – Snapshot

One of the most important stated goals of the South Korean space program is to develop domestic aerospace capabilities, specifically the capacity to manufacture and launch satellites. South Korea hopes to do this by investing in aerospace research and development and by strategically leveraging international partnerships.

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2008 – TIMSS

To gauge how U.S. elementary and middle school students compare with other students in math and science, the results of a test administered by the U.S. Department of Education, known as Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) provide a standardized global measure. The most recent test was administered in 2007.

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2008 – Sounding Rockets

The primary advantages of sounding rockets are their low cost, comparative ease of transport, ability to be launched from locations on land or sea, and relatively short turnaround times between mission concept and launch. These characteristics make sounding rockets a frequent choice of university science programs and research institutes that require less expensive access to space, enabling space-based experiments that might not otherwise receive funding.

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2008 – Other Countries, Launch, Payload

The Brazilian Space Agency has sporadically continued development of its proposed Veículo Lançador de Satélites (VLS) booster, designed to launch from the country’s Alcântara spaceport near the equator. Brazil hopes to perform further tests featuring a mockup rocket in 2010. Possibly as early as 2009, Brazil is expected to begin launching Ukrainian-built rockets under a joint venture between the two countries formalized in 2007.[

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2008 – Space Employment – Snapshot

The economic impacts and human capital effects of global space activity are mutually reinforcing. Worldwide space activity is a driver of industry and commerce, both in economic sectors with a primary space linkage and in secondary and tertiary supporting industries. As space-related economic activity stimulates economic growth, it employs individuals, shapes educational needs, and informs public policy priorities.

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